Obituaries

Lawrence Micciolo
B: 1942-11-30
D: 2022-11-28
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Micciolo, Lawrence
Alberto Solano
B: 1979-07-18
D: 2022-11-27
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Solano, Alberto
Maria Romano
B: 1940-07-21
D: 2022-11-22
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Romano, Maria
Roseanna Avino
B: 1934-08-19
D: 2022-11-20
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Avino, Roseanna
Lorraine Pollifrone
B: 1947-03-12
D: 2022-11-17
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Pollifrone, Lorraine
Carmen Seda
B: 1941-08-29
D: 2022-11-15
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Seda, Carmen
Robert Matovick
B: 1949-01-02
D: 2022-11-14
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Matovick, Robert
Lillian Cooper
B: 1955-02-17
D: 2022-11-13
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Cooper, Lillian
Gustave Romano
B: 1937-06-19
D: 2022-11-11
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Romano, Gustave
Isabelle Giordano
B: 1951-12-05
D: 2022-11-11
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Giordano, Isabelle
Giuseppe Scalici
B: 1933-08-17
D: 2022-11-09
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Scalici, Giuseppe
Rosa Spatola
B: 1921-12-28
D: 2022-11-06
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Spatola, Rosa
Frank Lastorino
B: 1939-04-09
D: 2022-11-05
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Lastorino, Frank
Steven Fishman
B: 1947-04-01
D: 2022-11-04
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Fishman, Steven
Albina Sudulich
B: 1931-09-12
D: 2022-11-01
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Sudulich, Albina
Mary Cumella
B: 1930-08-23
D: 2022-10-29
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Cumella, Mary
Lena Terranova
B: 1927-06-14
D: 2022-10-29
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Terranova, Lena
Giovanni Formica
B: 1933-04-06
D: 2022-10-26
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Formica, Giovanni
Charlotte Kelly
B: 1952-12-03
D: 2022-10-25
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Kelly, Charlotte
Frank Codispoti
B: 1939-03-18
D: 2022-10-23
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Codispoti, Frank
Joseph Fabrizio
B: 1964-02-22
D: 2022-10-21
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Fabrizio, Joseph

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1401 86th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11228
Phone: 718-331-8000
Fax: 718-621-9713
Robert Matovick
In Memory of
Robert E
Matovick
2022
Memorial Candle Tribute From
Scarpaci Funeral Home Inc.
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Condolences

Condolence From: Jerry and Ronnie Matovick
Condolence: Our Dear Brother Bob

Bob was the glue that held the family together; his heart was bigger than he was. He was always on the phone to touch base with a family member or friend to see how they were doing. Besides his immediate family, he managed to stay in touch with Aunts and Uncles and cousins who had moved distances away a number of years ago. He stayed in contact with buddies at work, friends from high school, and veterans from Vietnam. He would be the first person to make a sweet comment on a Facebook posting. Bob was a special person. Because Bob was in the world, you knew the world was all right. When he offered help, it wasn’t an empty gesture. You knew he would help, no questions asked.
Growing up, Bob had the nickname “Lefty” because he was a southpaw, but this Brooklyn boy was good with both hands, left and right. He played baseball and could scoop errant throws to first base, he could hit the ball a mile, he played the horn for Our Lady of Czestochowa’s Ramblers Drum and Bugle Corps, and he cooked and barbequed family meals, great comfort meals surrounded by laughter and good conversation. Aunt Patty remembers a Thanksgiving when Bob cooked pumpkin soup for the first time, and she remembers Bob was so proud because the soup was absolutely delicious. In retirement, he could hit a golf ball a mile, but what really mattered was that he was spending times with friends that he cared about. (Speaking about baseball, Bob assumed, for a time, the unenviable job of being an umpire, and bearing with unruly parents just so kids would have a chance to play and enjoy the game he loved.)
Bob had an impish, guileless sense of humor and enjoyment of life. He loved to tell Dad jokes which made himself laugh as much as the listener. He loved his gadgets and devices (who else would have a Covid mask with blinking lights?) He enjoyed one device in particular, his camera, with which he captured so many memorable family photos. Aunt Patty remembers Bob’s fun impersonation of Louis Armstrong’s singing and trumpet playing. Uncle Jerry remembers racing up and down the streets of Brooklyn with his strapping young brother squeezed behind the steering wheel of his tiny Fiat with the stick shift, honking a fun-size “meep-meep” continually on the horn. “We laughed so hard that we were in tears, the laughter filling the car interior and drowning out the blasting radio.” Bob’s disarming playfulness brought
so much fun to life.
In the end, we could say that Bob did everything right. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother, and uncle, who provided for his wife, children, grandchildren, and extended family. He would never miss a family event, especially those with a gathering of in-laws, nieces and nephews, and grandchildren. He proudly served his country in Vietnam and received a Purple Heart for the wounds he received in action.
When Bob left to serve in Vietnam, the Hollies produced a hit song that we feel epitomized our brother Bob’s love and concern for others. The song was “He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother,” and the lyrics describe a young man who’s willing to carry his loved ones and friends when they are in need and to be there for them:
The road is longWith many a winding turnThat leads us to who knows where, who knows where.But I'm strong,Strong enough to carry him.He ain't heavy, he's my brother.
… So on we goHis welfare is of my concern,No burden is he to bear,We'll get there.
He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother.

Bob will always be present to us because he continues to live transfigured in God’s love with his same sweetness of soul and tenderness of heart. Bob is translated into God’s goodness and love where we could pray for him and he for us.
Aunt Dolores writes: “I am heartbroken and suffering each day.  I am thankful I spoke to Bob, but each day I reflect on how much I will miss his phone calls and funny messages to my Facebook posts.  He kept the family connected and I thank God he was our loving brother, and in so many ways, our “matriarch.”
Aunt Patty writes, “My brother had the biggest heart. He was a great father, great husband, and great brother. He did his best to keep our family together. He didn’t have one bad
bone in his body, and he was full of nothing but LOVE, KINDNESS and GOODNESS. I know FOR SURE HE IS IN HEAVEN! I love him and I know he will always be with me and I will see him again!”
Uncle Jerry and Aunt Ronnie write, “Bob, we love you and are so proud of you and how you had conducted your life. You are the brother we admired as you grew up and the brother we admired as you cared for your family and friends. We love you, Bob, and always will. You, with your endearing smile, kind eyes, and compassionate words, remain with us forever.”
Friday November 18, 2022
Condolence From: Jerry and Ronnie Matovick
Condolence: Our Dear Brother Bob

Bob was the glue that held the family together; his heart was bigger than he was. He was always on the phone to touch base with a family member or friend to see how they were doing. Besides his immediate family, he managed to stay in touch with Aunts and Uncles and cousins who had moved distances away a number of years ago. He stayed in contact with buddies at work, friends from high school, and veterans from Vietnam. He would be the first person to make a sweet comment on a Facebook posting. Bob was a special person. Because Bob was in the world, you knew the world was all right. When he offered help, it wasn’t an empty gesture. You knew he would help, no questions asked.
Growing up, Bob had the nickname “Lefty” because he was a southpaw, but this Brooklyn boy was good with both hands, left and right. He played baseball and could scoop errant throws to first base, he could hit the ball a mile, he played the horn for Our Lady of Czestochowa’s Ramblers Drum and Bugle Corps, and he cooked and barbequed family meals, great comfort meals surrounded by laughter and good conversation. Aunt Patty remembers a Thanksgiving when Bob cooked pumpkin soup for the first time, and she remembers Bob was so proud because the soup was absolutely delicious. In retirement, he could hit a golf ball a mile, but what really mattered was that he was spending times with friends that he cared about. (Speaking about baseball, Bob assumed, for a time, the unenviable job of being an umpire, and bearing with unruly parents just so kids would have a chance to play and enjoy the game he loved.)
Bob had an impish, guileless sense of humor and enjoyment of life. He loved to tell Dad jokes which made himself laugh as much as the listener. He loved his gadgets and devices (who else would have a Covid mask with blinking lights?) He enjoyed one device in particular, his camera, with which he captured so many memorable family photos. Aunt Patty remembers Bob’s fun impersonation of Louis Armstrong’s singing and trumpet playing. Uncle Jerry remembers racing up and down the streets of Brooklyn with his strapping young brother squeezed behind the steering wheel of his tiny Fiat with the stick shift, honking a fun-size “meep-meep” continually on the horn. “We laughed so hard that we were in tears, the laughter filling the car interior and drowning out the blasting radio.” Bob’s disarming playfulness brought
so much fun to life.
In the end, we could say that Bob did everything right. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother, and uncle, who provided for his wife, children, grandchildren, and extended family. He would never miss a family event, especially those with a gathering of in-laws, nieces and nephews, and grandchildren. He proudly served his country in Vietnam and received a Purple Heart for the wounds he received in action.
When Bob left to serve in Vietnam, the Hollies produced a hit song that we feel epitomized our brother Bob’s love and concern for others. The song was “He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother,” and the lyrics describe a young man who’s willing to carry his loved ones and friends when they are in need and to be there for them:
The road is longWith many a winding turnThat leads us to who knows where, who knows where.But I'm strong,Strong enough to carry him.He ain't heavy, he's my brother.
… So on we goHis welfare is of my concern,No burden is he to bear,We'll get there.
He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother.

Bob will always be present to us because he continues to live transfigured in God’s love with his same sweetness of soul and tenderness of heart. Bob is translated into God’s goodness and love where we could pray for him and he for us.
Aunt Dolores writes: “I am heartbroken and suffering each day.  I am thankful I spoke to Bob, but each day I reflect on how much I will miss his phone calls and funny messages to my Facebook posts.  He kept the family connected and I thank God he was our loving brother, and in so many ways, our “matriarch.”
Aunt Patty writes, “My brother had the biggest heart. He was a great father, great husband, and great brother. He did his best to keep our family together. He didn’t have one bad
bone in his body, and he was full of nothing but LOVE, KINDNESS and GOODNESS. I know FOR SURE HE IS IN HEAVEN! I love him and I know he will always be with me and I will see him again!”
Uncle Jerry and Aunt Ronnie write, “Bob, we love you and are so proud of you and how you had conducted your life. You are the brother we admired as you grew up and the brother we admired as you cared for your family and friends. We love you, Bob, and always will. You, with your endearing smile, kind eyes, and compassionate words, remain with us forever.”
Friday November 18, 2022